Acupuncture and Winter. The Torbay Acupuncture Centre, Torbay, Devon.

Living With Winter

In Chinese Medicine winter is associated with the element of water and the emotions of fear and lack of fear. In ancient times it would have been a particularly harsh season, when personal survival would depend upon the preparations that had gone before. The harvesting of late summer and the storing and preserving of autumn all come to fruition at this time and allow for hibernation during the long winter nights. Things may be different now with the luxury of central heating, 24 hour supermarkets and electric light, but don’t be surprised it you find yourself feeling uncharacteristically fearful at this time. You may begin to worry about your health, about money or the state of the world – fear associated with winter is very primal and tends to focus on survival itself, not social or interpersonal concerns.

Along with those fears also be aware that you may find yourself throwing caution to the wind a little in a bit to rid yourself of the underlying dis – ease. This is the other side of winter – the ‘lack of fear’ or reckless spirit that pops up to try and challenge the forces at play.

Perhaps the best way to deal with the emotions that winter throws up is to take gentle heed. Make sure your house is in order. Make use of the long winter nights to do the checks and measure that usually get missed, so that you can reassure yourself that all the t’s have been crossed and the i’s dotted for another year. This knowledge can then steady you and allow you to rest in what should also be a restorative and peaceful time.

Rachel Geary

Rachel Geary BA(Hons), Lic. Ac. MBAcC is a fully qualified acupuncturist, having graduated from the College of Integrated Chinese Medicine in 2002. She has previously practiced in Inverness and Barnstaple. "I first became interested in acupuncture whilst I was at university studying History and Philosophy. I was particularly drawn to eastern philosophy, which I found particularly elegant and beautiful. I then went on to complete a three and a half year course of study in acupuncture and discovered it exemplify these very same qualities. I feel very privileged to have been able to learn so much about the Chinese understanding of health and to be able to use this knowledge to help others." Rachel Geary is a Registered Acupuncturist, she is registered at The British Acupuncture Council (BAcC), and The Association of Community and Multilbed Acupuncture Clinic (ACMAC).